Creativity – what could it look like in a school setting?

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Creativity is is not actually a single idea created in a single moment.

I’ve been spending some time thinking about the question – what could creativity actually look like in a classroom/school setting? And I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s not the absence of creativity in schools that we should be trying to address but the absence of student agency and effective teaching practice. And by agency, I mean every student being totally engaged with, and directing their own learning.

An analogy of the current prevailing teaching model is of a teacher pointing a fire hose at students and saying “open wide!” In contrast, the teaching model that defines high levels of student agency is of the water fountain that is available for students to drink from. Initially, the teacher’s task is to ensure that all children are taking on sufficient volumes of knowledge and are utilising it effectively. This task requires more than just curriculum knowledge. It requires skills of relationship – to know how much each child is willing and capable of absorbing and how willing and capable they are to apply that new knowledge. This is the human element of teaching – the teacher knowing every individual student’s capacity and being able to support them to build that capacity until learning becomes self-perpetuating. Students as self-directed learners etc.

It is at this point that creativity could flourish in a school setting. Students who are engaged and equipped with the essential knowledge can then springboard into creative pursuits. All that’s needed is a little bit of time, space and resources. How so? Because creativity is not actually a single idea created in a single moment. For example, take the creation of a unique dance. In a “creative” activity like producing a dance, most of the work is craft: the application of knowledge. You need to know how to dance – the technical qualities and features of a dance that the audience will recognise.

Nor are opportunities to be creative in the classroom limited to just the students. I am applying this same approach to creativity in how I teach. I have been teaching for a long time. I have built up a lot of experience. I know that the essential foundations of learning maths is familiarity with numbers – “come to the fountain and drink down some of this essential knowledge”. When I think the time is right, I start to introduce the idea of problem solving. Recently I have started to either,

  • ask the students to make their own problem and solve it, or
  • provide them with a problem with the answer and ask them to find as many different ways of getting to that answer.

It’s a very dynamic, oral-based process. Expectations are high. The children learn that they know better than anyone else what their ability/attitude level is. There are occasions of over or under reach which I need to remedy. Some need a bit of support. I help them fill in the knowledge gaps when necessary. Or better still, I get their student colleagues to help them do that. During this process I gain insights. I see light bulbs go on. It’s formative assessment at its most effective. I am looking to see who is working below, at or above their developmental level. I am in tune with every student’s academic and social level. And best of all, no one gets left behind.

Great effort. Now go do your work!

Ease Education: Teaching at a human scale.

You can also find Ease Education on Facebook and Twitter.

Some further reading on creativity can be found below…

https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/saturday/audio/2018642592/david-eagleman-secrets-of-the-brain

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/collections/201807/the-playful-way

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/play-in-mind/201806/reading-play?collection=1117036

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/play-in-mind/201803/the-self-the-deep-state-and-the-state-play?collection=1117036

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-craft-creativity/201805/creativity-think-gourmet-meals-not-magic-moments

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/creativity

One thought on “Creativity – what could it look like in a school setting?

  1. Pingback: Getting to grips with this thing called “student agency”. | Ease Education

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